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The growth of courier services, dedicated to food delivery, has in some markets become dominated by companies that began with on-line car and driver hire services, often mis-named "ride hailing." Their power in the market has enabled them to define the terms that they demand in contracts with food providers (often called, but often not, "restaurants"). At the pointy-end of such services is, in a significant number of markets, Uber, a company which has, since inception, displayed a disregard for local laws in countries which it has entered. It has also been widely criticised for the terms it imposes on the drivers and motorcycle riders it engages. As this case shows, it has also displayed a willingness to impose unfair contract terms on those it does business with.

CoNet Section: 

The old ways are the best, not the least of which is because there are always new users whose filters aren't ready for spam that hasn't been seen for a while.

This one's so old-fashioned, it's funny. Oh, and Google's failed to identify a landing page for spam and potentially illegal product sales. Artificial intelligence? Hah.

CoNet Section: 

If one could ever say that a circuit has a soul, one must, surely, say that about Silverstone, the home of the British Grand Prix for almost every running of that race since Formula One was born. And if a soul can be resurrected, to come alive and celebrate, Silverstone did just that. As the F1 circus rolled into town and set up shop, the biggest question was if this would be the last F1 at Silverstone and, even, if there would be a British Grand Prix after 2019. While the terms of the deal are secret, it is likely that the British Racing Drivers' Club, the owners of the former airfield and Liberty, the owners of F1, have done a deal under which the cost of running the race is reduced. The deal makes sure F1 comes home for at least the next five years. Then the grand old dame of F1 shed all her cares and woes and partied and what a party it was..

CoNet Section: 

After the EU's fuss several years ago over horse meat in packs of beef, a fresh food safety and security issue has arisen with the result that the Philippines has banned all imports of pork from Germany.

When the drains backed up in a city centre sports block, the cause turned out to be a mix of rubber and fabrics, paper and plastic: wet wipes, a variety of tissue papers, sanitary pads, disposable (haha) nappies, Q-tips, various forms of bodily output, plasticised paper (burger wrappers) and condoms were to blame. It wasn't a fatberg, as sewer techs call the stuff they routinely have to remove, but the effect was the same. If disposable nappies aren't actually disposable by any sensible definition of the term, what about using "flushable?" That's a case that has just come to court.

Inernet research company Ookla has produced a map that shows where there is 5G mobile network rollout. Some is active, some is in testing and some is installed but not yet available. There are some places in the world that are pretty busy. But there is one very surprising country that has, according to the map, absolutely no roll-out whatsoever. See if you can guess, before opening the map, which country it is.

CoNet Section: 

Following consultation on a number of proposed legislative changes that were set out in Consultation Paper No. 124 the Dubai Financial Services Authority Board, after due consideration of consultees’ comments, made amendments to the DFSA Rulebook as described below. The amendments come into force on 1 July 2019.

BIScom Subsection: 

This fraudster pretends to be a partner with a London law firm called "Richardson Lawyer Chamber" - without realising that the name contains a grammatical error that raises suspicion within the first few lines. And then there's his name: "David T Duddias" - a format very rarely used in the UK. Finally, the mail is sent from a mail address which may or may not be real and may or may not be spoofed but it's in Japan which raises its own questions and his return address is with that current favourite of fraudsters, Outlook.com. As if that's not bad enough, the spam-scam is plain: he wants to commit a fraud against someone else and he wants your help to launder the proceeds. Obviously, what he really wants is to defraud you. Read the full e-mail below.

The European Union has long had institutions for dealing with cyber-security issues. But there's an update and new features. And there are a couple of things it tells us about the EU itself, such as its continued progress to become a country and to have central instruments of government rather than to rely on member states to comply with Directives. But, equally importantly, what the update does is set the scene for more restructuring in the future, if the EU works out that it needs to develop efficiencies and reduce duplication.

CoNet Section: 

Case Summary: 

It has long been the case that, however one defines it, "communities" are represented by physical or psychological boundaries within which members feel safe. But there are those that exploit that sense of safety and target members of that community because of levels of trust. It's all related to the "people like us," syndrome explained in the book Understanding Suspicion in Financial Crime. This case is an example of multi-million USD scheme perpetrated in such circumstances.

Type of conduct: 
Ponzi / Pyramid fraud

It's the stuff that, if it's a TV or film plot, makes one want to shake one's head and wish that fiction writers would make things a little less far fetched; one feels that belief cannot be suspended when the concept is, well, so unbelievable. Prepare to shake your head again - this time asking why you thought it was so improbable because something that you would not believe is already old hat and the first conviction has just been recorded.

BIScom Subsection: 

When Edward Warlopp left his office and walked, he walked in front of a moving lorry. The driver, taking care manoeuvring in a complex environment was paying attention his surroundings and did not notice that Mr Warlopp had walked in front if the lorry. Mr Warlopp was struck and suffered fatal injuries.

CoNet Section: 

Australia is big. Seriously big. It is also empty. Seriously empty. With an estimated 90% of its population clustered into a handful of coastal cities (and some of those being small compared to Sydney and Melbourne), the cost of doing business can be disproportionately high in provincial and rural areas. One might think that would favour the internet and, for non-perishable, non-urgent things that's probably true although, as in many countries, the cost of delivery dramatically ramps up the cost of products in sparsely populated areas. What happens when towns become too small to support reasonable returns for businesses? Logic says "close up or combine." Australian regulators question that policy.

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