| | | Effective PR

Don't say "trusted into the spotlight", say "thrust into the spotlight."

Don't say that: 

"thrusted into the spotlight"

Do say this: 

"thrust into the spotlight."

Why?: 

There's a long established expression that a person is "thrust into the spotlight" which means that they are pushed forward so as to receive attention.

Imagine a class being told they did great work and one person being marked out as having played an especially key role.

"Thrust" is a term often found in physics: it means a force that pushes something. So you will hear jet engines described in terms of their thrust, or the amount of power they generate.

"Trust" is all about whether you can rely on something: can you believe and rely on what a person says? If so you can be said to trust him.

So, "thrust" and "trust" are very different.

We found this in the first sentence of an online article about video conferencing.

"Video Conferencing solutions have been trusted into the spotlight ever since in-person gatherings were prohibited and schools were prompted to switch to remote-learning overnight due to the COVID-19 outbreak. "

So, no. It's wrong. It should read "Video Conferencing solutions have been thrust into the spotlight ever since in-person gatherings were prohibited and schools were prompted to switch to remote-learning overnight due to the COVID-19 outbreak. "

It is important to note that "thrust" has no tenses. It is past, present and future. So it is never "thrusted."

That means that it is right to say "it was thrust", "it is thrust" and "it will be thrust."

There is one exception to that rule: "thrusting" . A person may be described as "thrusting" if he is, in effect, self-propelled, pushing himself forward, forceful. It is rarely seen as an attractive quality in polite circles.

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hahagotcha