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Compliance

This section collates news and information feeds from government departments and regulators around the world.

There is no cost to governments or regulators to have their information feeds appear here.

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Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

On 19th April, Australia's newest national bank, Members' Equity Bank a.k.a. ME Bank, announced that it was to increase its interest rates on existing home loans, with effect from 19th April. Then it made a silly error. Given that the banking sector in Australia is under the most intense scrutiny and that it would be logical to assume that, if at any time, this is the time where banks will double, triple even quadruple check their actions, the stupidity of the error raises a serious question: is the financial sector in Australia simply under-skilled and, therefore, unfit for purpose?

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

A thread on Linked-In raises the question of why the opportunity to join in the class action announced against Commonwealth Bank of Australia is not available to many shareholders. Here's a simplified guide to class actions - and why the CBA case bears more than a passing resemblance to a shareholder action against The Bank of New York.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill
BIScom Subsection: 

Canada's Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions has issued a regulatory notice containing a reminder that there are a number of reserved words, particularly those relating to banking, which may not be used without authority, in relation to financial services. It goes far beyond the use of the words in the name of businesses and will tighten up sloppy language in marketing and so-called social media. It might, also, inadvertently, make the point that "fintech" companies are not banks and do not afford consumers the protection that governments provide to bank depositors.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

This is such a massive topic that we can, today, do little more than make a placeholder article. How, one has to ask, does anyone "miss" tens of thousands of errors? We think it's probably not too difficult and banks, etc. should take note.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

There are two principles in the soft conversion of societies to various forms of centralised control, be that control from the left or right of politics, from vested interests or religion.

The first is the manipulation of language: using terms in ways that are inaccurate and, even, the direct opposite of what they truly mean.

The second is to give individual members of society the illusion that they have status, even a degree of control when in fact what they have is responsibility without authority.

Welcome to the worrying world of today's Compliance and Financial Crime Risk Officers.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

Below, free content, is my interview, given in May 2017 at the Thompson Reuters Regulatory Summit in Singapore, published today.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill
BIScom Subsection: 

It's frustrating just how fundamentally stupid some people can be.

In the aftermath of 11 September, 2001, the blame machine was hunting for excuses and part of it rightly fixated on funds transfers and, rightly, fixated on the unlicensed transfer systems which were lumped together under the Farsi name "hawala." Then stupid, ignorant people started trying to sound clever and instead of standing up to them and correcting them, others started to adopt their nonsensical, made up terminology. Now they want to include it in law.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

When the Department of Justice and others settled criminal proceedings against Western Union there were two special features: one, liability was admitted and two "ensure that its agents around the world will adhere to U.S. Regulatory and [counter-money laundering] standards."

Is this doable while remaining profitable or does the settlement mean inevitable de-risking and closing in some markets?

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

The cult of paying various US government departments, or "agencies" to say nothing of state prosecutors, to to avoid prosecution using the dubious formula of "without admitting or denying the allegations" has reached a new height as a Canadian banking group has "agreed to remit USD516,105 to settle its potential civil liability."

Note "potential." Are such deals evidence of bribery ("we'll give you money if you leave us alone") or of blackmail ("give us money or we'll cost you a fortune in dealing with a long and complex, and heavily disruptive investigation that we all know will turn up something in even the best run companies. And yes, of course we know you aren't American")

The trouble is: there were extensive compliance failures and, as in so many cases, a failure by a non-US bank to recognise the long arm of US law and regulation where US dollars are used.

Editorial Staff
BIScom Subsection: 

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