Log In | Subscribe | | |

IT & Communications

We all get the scams telling us that a criminal has our data. Many of us get scams saying that the criminals have details of access to pornographic websites and, even, footage taken from cameras on our desktop or laptop machines. Usually, we are told that we are being blackmailed and ordered to pay a sum, via bitcoin, to a specified wallet, 1Lughwk11SAsz54wZJ3bpGbNqGfVanMWzk. This wallet should, obviously, be disabled with immediate effect.

CoNet Section: 

When Drupal 8 was first announced, I installed it and within a couple of hours had given up with it. It was clunky, many of the modules I relied on were not available and may never be but, most of all, it was clear that if I wanted it to do what I wanted it to do I was going to have to relearn programming - which is exactly why we moved to Drupal: I can make Drupal 7 do what I want with minimal digging around under the covers. Three years and many releases later, as the threat of Drupal 7 reaching end of life becomes real, and in the light of some big complex sites we are building, it was time to review D8's progress. I don't just not like it, I actively detest it. And with one press of the delete key acting on the server, I'm free of it.

CoNet Section: 

When Australia took action against an internet scammer for sending out notices relating to domains (see here) the effect on those committing similar frauds was... zero.

CoNet Section: 

One can say many things about the EU but here are two: one it really, really does not understand the internet and how companies operate within it and two it really, really likes simplistic and brutal solutions to complex problems. Perhaps the two things are the same. Article 11 of the Copyright Directive, which a European Committee (the usual handful of grey men in grey suits that were so much a reason for Brexit) has just passed is a perfect example of both. The grey men in grey suits are different depending on the topic. The result is the same: they set law which is rarely subjected to effective review later in the legislative process. But protestors have missed the bus: it left in a 2001 Directive that hardly anyone pays attention to.

CoNet Section: 

E-mail inboxes have long been plagued with dubious offers to renew domain names or to buy similar names to prevent cybersquatters taking control of them or even for entries into some kind of directory. It's a nuisance but, so far, the perpetrators of the actions have avoided prosecution by a range of sneaky tactics. Australia's Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has obtained orders (not convictions) against two companies and a disqualification order against their principle officer.

CoNet Section: 

Sending server: webmail.123-reg.co.uk
Request for External Wire transfer

CoNet Section: 

We can do no more than post the content of three spams that arrived in five minutes and urge readers to block the domain trixologyvapors.com to prevent this hyperactive spammer's material reaching staff.

CoNet Section: 

I get it. India has more than 1,000 million people and lots of them work in some IT related job and they all have to earn a living. But, why do they all have to plunder our details from domain name registrations and send us offers for their services. Do they not realise that there are hundreds, literally hundreds, of them doing that every single day.

CoNet Section: 

On 4th April, Mark Zuckerberg was in full PR mode: he'd posted family photos on Facebook, carefully emphasising that in his house both Jewish and Christian festivals are marked with food but no sign of frivolity and he'd been seen looking suitably tired. He'd brushed off, at least so far as America is concerned, his refusal to appear before a British Parliamentary Committee. And he'd had a bit of the news agenda taken away from his own, and Facebook's bad news stream by the shooting at YouTube. And so, on a conference call with media selected by Facebook's PR people, when he began to present what he calls "Hard Questions: Q&A with Mark Zuckerberg on Protecting People’s Information" he was not expecting anything like the BBC's Hard Talk. And so it proved: he set the agenda, questions were soft and answers were nebulous.

CoNet Section: 

This weekend has been an interesting weekend for spam, not the least of which is because such a large amount got through our first line filters: far more than usual. But they were all stopped at the second line of defence and as we trawled through the blocked messages, we came across several that were worthy of comment. One is that old chestnut, the United Nations scam; another is the latest example from a spam-house that now allows us to identify their server farm and it is particularly interesting because it appears to promote a scheme that fell under the bus when the British tax authorities began action in relation to that scheme. And then there's the special mention of the persistent finditeasy.info which is just the most blatant spam-scam that it's hard to understand how they think it will pass any filter. And there's more....

CoNet Section: 

Pages