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One has to wonder just how stupid people must be to fall for the scams that some fraudster's perpetrate. Or to find themselves in a position where they suffer drive-by malware attacks. One of the interesting things that's happened since the CoVid-19 outbreak sent people scurrying home is just how many manual submissions we are receiving to enquiry forms. The vast majority are fraudulent or, at worst, using our platform for specifically prohibited purposes - which constitutes illegal access and it therefore a crime. So, what's going on?

FCRO Subsection: 

The authorities in Malaysia say that the corona-virus triggered lockdown in the capital, Kuala Lumpur, has led to a 67% reduction in crime. That, of course, might not be all that it seems - crime and reported crime not being the same and if people can't get to a police station, they can't make reports. Also, Malaysians have an odd habit: they make "police reports" at the drop of a hat, for all kinds of reasons, often political or for matters that in other countries would be regarded as civil matters not as police matters. When they do, they often issue a press release tp say they are going to do it and - incredibly, Malaysian media turns up to photograph them entering, or leaving, the police station. If people can't go out, they can't do that, either, so that may (we put it no higher than that) distorts the crime figures anyway.

But that aside, organised crime gangs, which are a business, are finding that their commercial activities are curtailed along with their movements. They...

CoNet Section: 

The current stance of both the EU and the UK is that the UK's withdrawal from the EU will not be delayed as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. But even the most optimistic must be aware that with governments both in disarray and fighting on all fronts to try to protect their citizens from the disease, the chances of meaningful work in the exit terms is remote.

And yet, with no constituencies to worry about, the EU's officials are pushing ahead with an ambitious legislative programme intending that such laws will be brought into effect before the UK departs and that the UK will, therefore be bound by them. And what will happen if the deadline is extended?

What is it with Hong Kong and its banks? The Hong Kong Monetary Authority has just announced yet another one is the victim of a passing-off campaign by internet fraudsters. It's the third this week and it's only Thursday.

And then there's this "In view of the latest situation of COVID-19, the HKMA hotline and Coin Cart services are temporarily suspended. The HKMA Information Centre is also temporarily closed to the public. Please visit the HKMA website/official Facebook page for details or latest updates:

Hotline services: HKMA website
Coin Cart services: HKMA website / official Facebook page
HKMA Information Centre: HKMA website"

BIScom Subsection: 

A spam purporting to be for "Richard White" a customer of the Main Savings Federal Credit Union has arrived. It tells him that he has collected more than 15,000 "CURewards points". And it wants him to log into a website for one of several different options.

BIScom Subsection: 

As countries around the world close their borders for international travel from badly affected countries, are airport transits a threat?

CoNet Section: 

In this page from the on-line resource "Don't be a victim: the Young Person's Guide to the Risks of Financial Crime," the financial crime risks facing everyone, young, old and that huge bit in the middle, arising from the Coronavirus and CoVid-19 pandemic are explained clearly.

Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals service has issued guidelines for witnesses who, because of CoVid-19, give evidence from a remote location. They will be expected to have regard to the same duty to tell the truth as if they were in a witness box in a courtroom.

CoNet Section: 

If it were not for one grossly irresponsible group, Malaysia's anti-viral policies would have been remarkably successful. But the long term effects might be problematic.

CoNet Section: 

This spear-phishing spam-scam is so amateur that some people might actually think it's real. It isn't.

FCRO Subsection: 

A man who can be identified only as B4 left the UK to go to Syria to join al Qaeda, the UK government alleges. A citizen of Libya, he took UK citizenship in addition. The UK Home Department (part of the Home Office) decided to cancel his British citizenship and passport. He has appealed and, at the same time, applied for anonymity. His appeal is stayed pending a determination of his application for legal aid.

CoNet Section: 

Société Générale Securities Australia is subject to criminal charges brought by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission.

SocGenSecAus? If you think that's silly, the acronym used by ASIC is worse: "SGSAPL". We'll just stick wiith "SocGen Securities".

BIScom Subsection: 

It's incredible - a tiny bar that has no nameplate, that is hidden behind a door bearing the sign "no admittance" and holding only 25 people in an unfashionable district of Kuala Lumpur's city centre is famous. It's such a cool, almost magical, place that it's the kind of place you keep for special occasions. It's regularly featured in "Best Bars" in all kinds of magazines and, even, seat-back glossies in airlines.

And, sadly, in just a few days, it will be gone.

There's no point in discussing this at length. A spam arrived. It's spreading fear and it's a fraud.

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