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ItsTimeToLookAfterYourself.com

The global airbag scandal involving TAKATA airbags just won't go away. In Australia, BMW, GM Holden, Honda, Mitsubishi and Toyota have been trying to contact some 20,000 car owners to replace the defective equipment but have had no response. Now the government has stepped in. "do not drive these cars at all," it says.

The email below has come to our attention today. using a landing page at mybluemix[dot]com and a (perhaps spoofed) address at the domain masew.ml, the scam has characteristics that instantly give it away to the alert but will trap the unwary.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has established a Button Battery Taskforce to investigate ways to reduce risk to the Australian community, particularly children, of button batteries.

Spoofing email addresses (that is making it look like an e-mail comes from somewhere other than its actual sender) is a remarkably easy trick and it's heavily relied on by spammers. However, this particular spam goes further, aping the tactics used by those who send e-mails that appear to come from banks. Be warned....

This is mind-numbing.

According to the Australian Consumer and Competition Commission, since the announcement of the recall of Takata airbags, in Australia alone they are being replaced at an average of 4,000 per day.

It's not enough, they say.

After the EU's fuss several years ago over horse meat in packs of beef, a fresh food safety and security issue has arisen with the result that the Philippines has banned all imports of pork from Germany.

This fraudster pretends to be a partner with a London law firm called "Richardson Lawyer Chamber" - without realising that the name contains a grammatical error that raises suspicion within the first few lines. And then there's his name: "David T Duddias" - a format very rarely used in the UK. Finally, the mail is sent from a mail address which may or may not be real and may or may not be spoofed but it's in Japan which raises its own questions and his return address is with that current favourite of fraudsters, Outlook.com. As if that's not bad enough, the spam-scam is plain: he wants to commit a fraud against someone else and he wants your help to launder the proceeds. Obviously, what he really wants is to defraud you. Read the full e-mail below.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: 20190606

This article was published yesterday under the title "It's Time To Take Care Of Yourself How did it come to this? A healthy teenager is put to death, at her own request." It has been brought to my notice that, despite finding apparent confirmation of a significant fact across many examples of reputable media, the information was unreliable. Equally, at least at the time of writing this notice, it is not clear that the contrary views are reliable either. Nevertheless, I have made modifications to the article so as to avoid any potential distress to the family of the girl concerned, while the vast majority of the article is about circumstances rather than that specific case. The article is, therefore, republished as amended.

If there's a way to force non-FB group users into the fold, Facebook is going to find it. Within the past few days, it has removed one of the most useful features of Instagram: the ability of millions of mobile users to "lurk" and read comments posted on a page. Why? Because it's failed to force them to sign up by an utterly obtrusive "splash screen" that's a bugger to remove because the X is in the wrong place. For now, it's latest change does not affect desktop users but, just as FB itself has made it increasingly difficult to access supposedly public information without an account, surely that's going to change.

The Board of Supervisors for the City and County of San Francisco are a long, long, long way down the pecking order when it comes to legislation. Unlike the US Congress, where Members can pass motions that amount to comment not law, the Board of Supervisors can pass law - but it may well have no practical effect. So exactly what is the newly announced law and how much weight will it carry?

A report by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission says that there has been an increase of 5% in the number of reports by the elderly of fraud committed against them. The total losses, however, increased by 22%. And they are not the only victims, the ACCC found.

May Day is a remarkably long-standing tradition, far pre-dating the political statement it has become - and even that statement is more than 100 years old.

A recent court action against a car hire company demonstrates that the insurance sold with the car is not necessarily what hirers think it is.

In the UK last year, 33 people were killed in agriculture, eight of them while handling cattle.

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