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The EC has released a note on a meeting held last week between the EU's President Juncker and the UK's Prime Minister May. It's pathetic. Read it below. Then read on to find out why we say they are both right but they are both wrong.

When historians look back on the UK's withdrawal from the European Union, they will be focussed on whatever interests them: for some it will be the will of the people, for some it will be the choice of a "Remain" campaigner to lead the exit negotiations, for others it will focus on any one of dozens of politically motivated stands and rhetoric and for others it will focus on the drama that has surrounded attempts to do something mind-numbingly complicated that has never been done before under what turns out to be an arbitrary time-table. Then there will be the fact that partisan interests have taken over from the national interest....

There is no fixed deadline for a deal to be done but there is, in principle, a date upon which the UK will no longer be part of the EU. That date, however, is not actually as fixed as it might appear and there is authority for saying that the UK could press reset and start the whole negotiation period afresh when the UK and the EU have got their acts together.

We have considered what a "soft brexit" means (here) and in this article, we look at a "hard brexit" also known as a "no deal brexit."

It's incredible. The European Union has produced five Money Laundering Directives and still in some respects it is not one but two steps behind some countries that are often subject to criticism. Indeed, it is behind many of its own member states. This week, the Council of the European Union "adopted" a "regulation." Politically, the fact that a Regulation has been made is more important than what it does.

This morning, Commissioner for Employment, Social Affairs, Skills and Labour Mobility, Marianne Thyssen, received Michael O'Leary, CEO of Ryanair. The meeting took place at the request of Mr O'Leary, to discuss the current dispute at the airline company on the application of EU labour law and the steps Ryanair is taking.

CoNet Section: 

The European General Data Protection Regulation is a fantastically complex piece of legislation but it is not an "Act" or, as Acts are called in the EU, a Directive.

It has been brought into law across the EU (and beyond) and will come into force on 25th May 2018.

Most importantly, it proves how domestic law in member states can be written by Europe outside the democratic process.

CoNet Section: 

There is something almost sad about Angela Merkel's campaign to remain relevant in world, EU and, even, German politics. Increasingly isolated on all fronts, her political rallies are carefully photographed to give the impression of many supporters rather then the dozens that actually turn up. And she's trying to find pro-EU leaders to cozy up to - in denial of the fact that her brand of EU politics is one of the things most putting the future of the Union at risk. Increasingly strident, demanding, almost hectoring of her audience, Merkel is beginning to sound like an extremist, even if her words speak of a particular form of unity. Then again, she might just be positioning herself for a top EU role.

CoNet Section: 

PART One of this article appears at http://www.pleasebeinformed.co...

In its Conclusion the Joint Opinion implies a monumental failure of the European machine. And it has little to say beyond that already known and widely not acted upon.

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