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Kenya

We haven't seen this one for a while, or rather we've not seen it in this format.

The simplest and oldest 419 scam is back in time for Christmas.

And once more, Google is complicit. Look at the "reply to" address. How is not possible that they are not required to identify and block things such as this? Oh, yes. They say "we are google. We are big. You can bog off."

FCRO Subsection: 

This really is a story about money laundering. Stay with us: first, it's not at all a done deal that whatever happens in Brexit, UK lawyers will lose out for any reason except sentiment. Yes, long term, international recognition may be more complex but that could well turn out to be to the advantage of English (specifically, but perhaps one or two South Wales firms might be included) lawyers as their gene pool becomes less diluted. But everyone acknowledges that there should be some kind of hedge against that risk and so large firms are putting in place measures to be, in effect, dual citizens (not legally accurate, of course). Now Theresa May, in need of a win, has done something that will both assist UK lawyers and really, really get up the nose of those Eurocrats who are trying to frustrate the will of the UK people. And there's a not-to-well hidden benefit for British businesses outside the legal sector, too.

German bank, Deutsche Bank has reportedly closed its correspondent relationships with National Bank of Kenya (NBK), a commercial bank. There are allegations of mismanagement and accounting fraud, plus suspicions of money laundering. Several members of the senior management team have left in recent weeks, not entirely voluntarily.

Josephine Kabura, the woman at the centre of the National Youth Service scandal in Kenya, is a hairdresser although her salon has been locked up for several months. Exactly how does an apparently ordinary person end up right in the middle of a scheme to extract GBP6.3million from a government department?

The prosecution of senior staff at Kenya's Family Bank ( see story ) is just part of a knot that investigators are slowly unravelling and finding out things that there are many in government would rather not be found out. So would several banks.

It is a mark of the integrity of a country as to how it deals with counter-money laundering laws. Politicians who consistently vote to exclude measures that catch bribery and corruption as predicate crimes for money laundering must automatically render the whole country as suspicious, applying the argument that fish rots from the head. Kenya was one of a number of countries that suffered this problem with leaders being constantly frustrated by other members of government. A compromise Act was eventually passed. Now it's bearing fruit. And the role of the targets will ricochet around the world.

hahagotcha