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SEO

It's incredible how many spammers lie, even those who fill in a webform and have to pass bot-resistant tools to submit it. This one makes an amazing lie: that he found our own Group company details on Facebook. Well, we don't have any Facebook page so that's not true. It's for that old figment of the imagination, SEO services, including on Instagram which, also, we don't use. Even the completion of the formal parts of the form show dishonestly and a willingness to mislead. Not bright at all.

CoNet Section: 

Spammers have long been involved in directory fraud of one sort or another. Just as in the days of paper, letters are carefully phrased to make victims think they must make a payment. Then, hidden away at the bottom of the page is a note saying "this is not an invoice" and something along the lines of "you only have to pay if you want the service." These days, the spam-scammers also include something to tell you that they are complying with the USA's spam facilitation Act, mysteriously known as the Can Spam Act. And this one doesn't even tell victims what service they are supposedly subscribed to.

FCRO Subsection: 

Fraud is cyclical. Historically, frauds would lie dormant for, perhaps, five years then come back. But the cycle has become much shorter, often only two or three months. Some frauds have become perpetual, aided by e-mail that hits so many prospective targets at such a low marginal cost. Others have a few days in the light before disappearing into relative darkness for a matter of weeks, perhaps because the targets are sorted by e.g. alphabetical order, into batches. One such is fraud relating to domain names. They take several forms but the same basic structure. The fraudster hints that, if you don't pay up, your domain name will stop working. Here's the anatomy of one such fraudulent mail that has reached us multiple times in the past several days.

CoNet Section: 

It's incredible how many spammers (not, scammers) don't think that their standard of English reflects on the quality of work they might offer.

Below is an example of the many spam e-mails that find their way into our electronic shredder because we don't want to read them but, sometimes, it's worth looking to see how advertising is presented. This example is never, ever, going to get business from any business that requires professional standards of itself and its suppliers.

CoNet Section: 

I get it. India has more than 1,000 million people and lots of them work in some IT related job and they all have to earn a living. But, why do they all have to plunder our details from domain name registrations and send us offers for their services. Do they not realise that there are hundreds, literally hundreds, of them doing that every single day.

CoNet Section: 

abhi.garg126@outlook.com. Spam him, please. All website scrapers, email harvesters, even those who engage dozens of people in dark rooms in Delhi, get that address. Put it on every mailing list you can find. Bomb it. Block the mailbox. Make Microsoft...

CoNet Section: 
hahagotcha