Log In | Subscribe | | |

social media

It all sounds as if it's tailor made for cynics: a government looks at high-growth companies using what it terms "non-traditional data" (which turns out to be social media comment about and by the company and the companies's own websites) and uses it to predict what industries and what regions may thrive. And cynics would be right: social media comment tends to be polarised and out of balance and websites are, of course, the bearers of good tidings. So what's going on?

CoNet Section: 

When we launched PleaseBeInformed.com, one of our fundamental principles of design was that only those who we had taken reasonable steps to identify and verify would be permitted to post, even to comment. That decision was at the heart of our plan to charge a small annual membership fee, paid by credit card. While American-based social media networks spread across the world with more and more fraudulent accounts, China, it is reported, is taking steps to combat the use of social media for financial and "news" fraud, for that is what fake news and scurrilous social media comment is, at their heart.

CoNet Section: 

Part 1: see http://pleasebeinformed.com/pu...

Twitter is tiring.

Twitter? Seriously, who actually reads Twitter aside from the media looking for snatched quotes? It's just noise.

As if being accused of risking perverting the course of justice (and giving Australian police the virtual finger) isn't enough (story) Facebook has now caused even more annoyance by refusing to remove a page that identifies operational undercover assets in Victoria.

CoNet Section: 

After half-a-a decade of widespread criticism of China for the controls it has placed on the use of the internet including access to material that, in the opinion of the Chinese government, undermines the authority of the government and courts, Australia is wondering how to achieve the same result without incurring the ire of millions and the ridicule of the global community.

CoNet Section: 

A US Judicial Conference Committee has updated the model set of jury instructions federal judges use to deter jurors from using social media to research or communicate about cases on which they serve. The new guidelines provide detailed explanations of the consequences of social media use during a trial, along with recommendations for repeated reminders of the ban on social media usage.

CoNet Section: